IFMA Awards for Excellence 2016

dan-castner-ifma-blog-post

Dan Castner of BAM has received an IFMA Awards for Excellence nomination as a Distinguished Chapter Volunteer: Service Provider Member.  This award is presented not to a company, but to an individual “who has shown an outstanding commitment to the Chapter by participating in Chapter events and programs and by volunteering on a committee.”

Dan was previously named Distinguished Associate Member at the 2015 IFMA Awards for Excellence for outstanding leadership within the organization at an international level. Dan’s architectural creativity lent itself to event planning, as Dan initially left his mark on IFMA by arranging a highly popular wine tasting.  The fundraiser was so popular that the amount of guests surpassed the expected registration and it became an annual August fundraiser. His leadership extends to IFMA’s World Workplace conference, where Dan previously served as a seminar moderator, contributed to educational sessions and continuously highlights specific conference topics to influence local chapter events. His dedication to IFMA led to his position as Vice Chair of the Programs Committee, allowing him to work closely with the Chair to shape the educational, social, and fundraising events throughout the year.  Dan is spearheading a collaboration between the Hudson Valley and New York City Chapters, offering several programs to benefit members outside of the New York City region.

The IFMA Awards for Excellence will be held on January 26, 2017 at an awards ceremony and dinner hosted by the New York City IFMA Chapter.

Register to attend the IFMA Awards for Excellence here!

BAM Celebrates Sweet 16

bam-email-sweet-sixteen-3

Over the past sixteen years, we at BAM are thankful for the creative collaborations with our clients, consultants and each other.

To commemorate our sixteenth birthday, a variety of vibrant images were designed to acknowledge this milestone. Each of our clients and consultants received a different image in our anniversary email. You may recognize one of the images among those featured in our exciting, color-rotating 16 above! Which one did you receive?

 

Opening: Reorg Research

On October 6th, Reorg Research held a soiree to celebrate the opening of its new workplace designed by the BAM team. The sleek open-office reflects the client brand by incorporating blue throughout the space. Diverse light fixtures and scarlet seating in collaborative areas serve as striking design accents. A notable element is the entry wall featuring the Reorg Research name and local time for New York, London, and Los Angeles. Reorg Research commented that employee morale has skyrocketed in the new office, and the client team expressed their excitement over BAM’s specific design details throughout the evening.

Image

BAM Internship: Graphic Design

Click to read the full internship posting.

graphic-design-internship-fall-2016_updated

Image

BAM is Hiring: Interior Designer

Click to read the full job posting.BAM is Hiring - Interior Designer.png

Gray Space: Ross Cole Interview in Real Estate Weekly

rew_logo2

CoreNetGraySpace

Following the successful CoreNet panel Working in Gray Space, Holly Dutton of Real Estate Weekly interviewed BAM Principal Ross Cole about his insights on how Gray Space is transforming the future of office real estate.

Read the article at Real Estate Weekly.

BAM + CoreNet: Working in Gray Space

BAM Principal Ross Cole moderated an engaging panel exploring how real estate strategies are impacted by Gray Space trends. Gray Space is non-traditional ways people work in unconventional places. The panel was held on August 3rd in collaboration with the CoreNet Technology Committee.

Ross was joined on the panel by Robert Balder, Executive Director at Cornell University, Gonzalo Cruz, an urban designer, and Eric Stride, a security technologist. The CoreNet panel yielded helpful takeaways on the transition to Gray Space work and how this will affect the future office.

  1. Quest to spur industry disruption.  Companies are taking space in shared offices specifically to encourage “speed to innovation” that comes from combining a diversity of people. The blending of varied departments is shown to result in faster industry game-changers than the silo world of working.  To encourage this frictionless collaboration, Cornell University intentionally commissioned a building to house multiple specialties. In past years, academic programs were more likely to be found in separate buildings.
  2. Hardware is becoming worthless. Technological advancements mean the work is no longer about the hardware.  Instead of relying on a computer or phone, many see the future in virtual desktops. The virtual desktop contains all an employee’s files and can be called up on any device, anywhere. It’s more secure than storing data on a mobile device and improves working agility. Today, workers are asking for USB charging stations in parks and meeting places. Instead of carrying laptops or USB drives, gathering spaces of the future may build devices directly into the environment. This will allow people to have screens to work on whether they meet in a bar, a Starbucks, or even a park.
  3. Hacking using old technology – eyes and ears.  While the value of the hardware is becoming less important, the sharing of information in public environments is becoming more common and therefore more of a security concern.   Sharing information in Gray Spaces means the information could be taken, creating issues for the companies. Stolen information could result in a variety of problems, including insider trading that lands a company in trouble with the SEC. The public sharing could also cause the theft of intellectual property, impacting the pipeline of an R&D organization.  We haven’t been trained to be conscious of hacking; we just keep clicking “yes” to get WiFi access without ever really considering the implication.  Attention needs to turn to protocols to remind workers to remain aware of their surroundings and use their eyes and ears to be vigilant of the security compromises that may arise when working in Gray Spaces.