Tag Archives: Technology

Industry Giant Re-Engages BAM

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Innovation is born from the desire to learn, collaboration with a diverse team, the drive to improve upon current practices, and the tools to turn ideas into reality. The design of a space, from the aesthetic feel to the ease of access to technology, strongly influences the speed to innovation. BAM has successfully completed highly technical facilities for our client, leading to research and products that change the landscape of findings in science.

With our capacity for efficient communication, understanding client needs, and smooth project delivery, our team was recently awarded multiple opportunities for a confidential aerospace client. In line with these new opportunities, BAM has designed cutting-edge environments for science, innovation, and learning by incorporating a few key elements into each design:

Equipment for technological breakthroughs

Technology, from computers to laboratories to aeronautics, enables our client to research and develop a variety of groundbreaking solutions to problems that exist today. BAM has worked closely with the client to determine the exact equipment to suit their needs, and ensured they had the necessary power to keep the equipment running at the highest efficiency. Our team tracked the actions of the scientists throughout the development process and designed an equipment layout to follow these steps, resulting in ease to track results and improve methods. Efficiency in the development process results in products getting to market faster.

In support of physical science research, BAM is designing technically demanding manufacturing spaces and integrated laboratories to create, study and test products and systems in extremely realistic simulations. From client meetings, our team understands that exact temperatures are vital to the manufacturing process, and we are mindful of these details in design. The unique manufacturing oven features liquid nitrogen and nitrogen gases to maintain the correct level of cooling with the heat exhaust and off-gasses safely vented during the manufacturing process. Clients utilize integrated laboratories to capture information of how a product will withstand varied situations, and this enables researchers to improve products through concrete data. A key benefit is the ability to draw investors to the product, as potential customers have the opportunity to see the new product in action.

Collaboration breeds creativity

How do innovative ideas come to be? There are many factors, but an element that stands out is the fresh approach that comes from sharing your thoughts with others. The opportunity to brainstorm problems and discuss ideas away from desks and outside the laboratory in more informal settings puts creators and inventors in different mindsets. BAM has designed pantries that expand beyond the traditional role of a small place to store food and prepare meals. Modern salons that encourage exchange of ideas, our pantries feature long, shared counters, small and medium tables with comfortable seats, and room in the kitchen for chances to chat by the water cooler or coffee machine made frictionless with technology on demand.

Similar to the pantry, for spaces that have often served one primary function, our designers have created a multi-use space by incorporating the idea of teamwork into the layout. Interior pedestrian bridges transform into ideal areas to relax and discuss ideas openly with beautiful landscape views and colorful, cozy sofas that wind into interesting shapes. Huddle areas are an easy addition into any office, from small spaces to open areas. Created specifically with collaboration in mind, huddle areas may feature tall tables or a few close seats throughout an office for impromptu meetings and discussions.

At BAM, remaining attentive to technological needs and designing spaces that support collaboration led to repeat project engagements. This continued partnership speaks to BAM’s larger goal – designing for the success of our client.

Brian Spence named as Panelist on AIA LA BioTech Forum

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Founding Principal at BAM, Brian has been invited to present on an AIA panel of distinguished leaders in the Los Angeles A/E/C industry.

Focusing on the adaptive reuse of old line industrial property for biotech labs, Brian will discuss the conversion and market repositioning of underutilized commercial sites.  He will focus on BAM’s exciting collaboration with Alhambra Agora, LLC on the HATCH biotech facility. BAM led the conversion of a factory and warehouse into a facility that provides the resources for biotech startups to hatch and grow in Los Angeles.   See the latest updates on HATCH here.

Featuring two case studies of repositioning properties for biotech use, attendees will walk away with fresh insights into the evolving trends of design, real estate and site selection for research, science and technology startups.

When:
March 14, 2017
5:30pm – 7:30pm

Where:
Buro Happold Consulting Engineers Inc.
800 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90017

Space is limited – register today!

Click below to see photos from the event.
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Gray Space: Ross Cole Interview in Real Estate Weekly

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Following the successful CoreNet panel Working in Gray Space, Holly Dutton of Real Estate Weekly interviewed BAM Principal Ross Cole about his insights on how Gray Space is transforming the future of office real estate.

Read the article at Real Estate Weekly.

BAM + CoreNet: Working in Gray Space

BAM Principal Ross Cole moderated an engaging panel exploring how real estate strategies are impacted by Gray Space trends. Gray Space is non-traditional ways people work in unconventional places. The panel was held on August 3rd in collaboration with the CoreNet Technology Committee.

Ross was joined on the panel by Robert Balder, Executive Director at Cornell University, Gonzalo Cruz, an urban designer, and Eric Stride, a security technologist. The CoreNet panel yielded helpful takeaways on the transition to Gray Space work and how this will affect the future office.

  1. Quest to spur industry disruption.  Companies are taking space in shared offices specifically to encourage “speed to innovation” that comes from combining a diversity of people. The blending of varied departments is shown to result in faster industry game-changers than the silo world of working.  To encourage this frictionless collaboration, Cornell University intentionally commissioned a building to house multiple specialties. In past years, academic programs were more likely to be found in separate buildings.
  2. Hardware is becoming worthless. Technological advancements mean the work is no longer about the hardware.  Instead of relying on a computer or phone, many see the future in virtual desktops. The virtual desktop contains all an employee’s files and can be called up on any device, anywhere. It’s more secure than storing data on a mobile device and improves working agility. Today, workers are asking for USB charging stations in parks and meeting places. Instead of carrying laptops or USB drives, gathering spaces of the future may build devices directly into the environment. This will allow people to have screens to work on whether they meet in a bar, a Starbucks, or even a park.
  3. Hacking using old technology – eyes and ears.  While the value of the hardware is becoming less important, the sharing of information in public environments is becoming more common and therefore more of a security concern.   Sharing information in Gray Spaces means the information could be taken, creating issues for the companies. Stolen information could result in a variety of problems, including insider trading that lands a company in trouble with the SEC. The public sharing could also cause the theft of intellectual property, impacting the pipeline of an R&D organization.  We haven’t been trained to be conscious of hacking; we just keep clicking “yes” to get WiFi access without ever really considering the implication.  Attention needs to turn to protocols to remind workers to remain aware of their surroundings and use their eyes and ears to be vigilant of the security compromises that may arise when working in Gray Spaces.